FRB applies global market shock to IHCs

Nearly one year after the Federal Reserve Board (FRB) subjected certain intermediate holding companies (IHCs) to the CFO attestation requirement for the FR Y-14A/Q/M regulatory reports, it further amended the reports by, among other things, modifying the scope of the global market shock (GMS) component of the Dodd-Frank Act stress tests (DFAST) to include certain IHCs.

GMS applicability

Specifically, the FRB amended the application of the GMS to include any firm that (1) has aggregate trading assets and liabilities of $50 billion or more, or aggregate trading assets and liabilities equal to 10 percent or more of total consolidated assets, and (2) is not a “large and noncomplex firm” under its capital plan rule.1 As a result of this change, the FRB expects that six IHCs will become subject to the GMS, and the six US bank holding companies that meet the current materiality threshold will remain subject to the requirement.

Although the FRB finalized the amendment to the GMS threshold as proposed, it decided to delay the application of the GMS to firms that will become newly subject to it (i.e., the six IHCs) until the 2019 Comprehensive Capital Analysis and Review (CCAR) and DFAST exercises (rather than the 2018 exercises, as originally proposed).  The FRB explains that it “recognizes the challenges associated with building the systems necessary to report the data in the trading schedule.”2

However, the FRB emphasized that the “materiality of trading exposures and counterparty positions to US IHCs may warrant applying an additional component to firms that meet such criteria.”  Accordingly, it noted that it may apply such components or scenarios under the 2018 DFAST exercise.

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